Tips for using backpack effectively

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Tips for using backpack effectively
Tips for using backpack effectively

A well-loaded bag will feel balanced when leaning on your hips and nothing should be shifting or swinging inside. The following simple tips that help you using backpack effectively.

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Packing the Bottom of Backpack

Put items only use at night at the bottom of the bag
Put items only use at night at the bottom of the bag

You should put the items you won’t need until you make camp at night in the bottom of the bag. Most backpackers often place their sleeping bag into the bottom of the backpack. This is also where you may keep long underwear that will be used as sleepwear, a pillow cover and a sleeping pad (if you can roll it up into a small shape).
Any other items that you only use at night can go down low except for a headlamp or flashlight.

Packing the Center of Backpack

Heavier items should be kept in the center of your pack
Heavier items should be kept in the center of your pack

Heavier items should be kept in the center of your pack. This aim to create a soft center of gravity. Bulky pieces too low can make your pack sag down. Too high position can cause the pack feel unsteady.

Normally, these items will be your food stash, water supply and cook kit and stove. If carrying liquid fuel, make sure your fuel bottle cap is on tightly. Pack the bottle upright and place it on your food in the event of a spill.
Wrap softer, lower-weight parts around the heavier pieces to prevent them from shifting. Your tent body, rain fly, and a rain jacket can support uphold the core and fill the empty place.

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Other Tips for using backpack effectively

Fulfill all empty area: You can put utensils, a cup or a small piece of clothing within your cooking pots. 

Share the weight of large common elements like tent with others in your team. You can carry the main body, for example, and your friend can bring the rain fly and poles.

Squeezing straps: Tighten all the compression straps to restrict load-shifting.

Rain cover: Bring a rain cover for your pack and keep it accessible. Although some backpacks are made with waterproof fabric, their seams and zippers are unsafe to drainage during a downpour. A pack cover is deserving its weight in persistent rain.